Reading · Writing

Choose your own adventure. Or lack of it.

You decide it’s not a good idea to look into the cabinet. What if it’s filled with spiders? You shudder and start down the corridor again, but then you notice something strange. The corridor now appears to be stretching endlessly before you. You turned around to look for the door you came through at the start of the corridor and notice a long stretch of narrow space that was not there before.

You panic and start to run back where you came from, but the more you run, the longer the corridor seems to stretch. You don’t like this. You really do not like this. You want to get out of her but the house seems to want to keep you there forever. You try a door at random, but it’s locked. You try another door. Locked. Locked. Locked still. You shout for help, but know it’s useless. Who would hear you in such a place? You shout just the same, feeling the tears spring to your eyes; all you want is to get out, out, out…

“Hey. Hey. Wake up. WakeΒ up.

You bolt up in bed, shaking, your back damp with sweat. Your significant other sits next to you, looking concerned. They reach out and pet your arm soothingly, and you start to feel safe. You will your heart to calm down.

“Shhh, it’s okay. It was just a nightmare. Go back to sleep. I’m right here.”

The End.Β 

108 thoughts on “Choose your own adventure. Or lack of it.

      1. That’s right — “Bob watched another leaf fall off his aspidistra. If only he knew what was wrong with it. But he just didn’t want to talk to anyone for at least another month…” Yawn.

        1. Poor Bob. Life could be interesting… If only his issues had issues, maybe he wouldn’t be so lonely… πŸ™‚

    1. Haha, you can do whatever floats your boat! I just didn’t want to make this post too long or people would get bored reading it. πŸ˜‰

    1. I actually was inspired by R.L.Stine’s Give Yourself Goosebumps series. πŸ˜€ Those were lots of fun! Thank you for your comment!

      1. I haven’t read any of his Gooosbumps books, I read the other books that R L Stine wrote. His books, Christopher Pike, and others were the reason why I wanted to start writing. I use to have so much more creative stories in my head 20 years ago than I do now.

        1. I assume you mean Fear Street? πŸ™‚ It’s funny you should say that, because R.L.Stine’s books made me went to tell stories of my own too. And I can relate! When I was younger I used to come up with story ideas left, right and center. Now I’m lucky if I can come up with one every few months.

    1. “Poppet” is a funny pet name. I will always be grateful to Pirates of the Caribbean for introducing me to it. πŸ˜‰ Thank you for your comment!

  1. I know a fellow who’s writing a story based on the choices people vote for, but it seems that his readers are all incredibly dull and choose the safe options most of the time.

    1. Yikes. Your friend’s method of writing sounds pretty fun, but seems to me they need a new audience! Nothing’s good come out of playing it safe… well, at least in fiction!

  2. I have to admit that I prefer this media for “choose your own adventure” to paging through a book. I don’t find myself “peeking” at possibilities as I page past. πŸ™‚

    1. You’re not the only one who used to do that! I always thought that if I took a little peek it wouldn’t be considered as “cheating”, but most of the time I always ended up dead!

    1. Thanks! I thought I’d try to be a little creative with it. πŸ˜‰ And I always enjoyed interactive stories, so I thought it would work well!

  3. Thanks you kindly for the fine article full of information I have needed inside out. I will be sure to pay many visits to all future articles of such good taste. Keep up with the good hard work. And speaking, I have some tiny magic pills that will make you know like a tree. Only two cents minus three for a bottle that will give you much happiness for all to see.

  4. I adore pieces like this,I would go in,heart thumping.Most likely caring a can of Diet Pepsi and in my back pocket a journal,pen. This is me anyway. I would have a ball poking around and seeing what i could. what a great article

  5. As a child and you teen, choose your own adventure books were quite popular and as an adult I have often thought about them, and missed them. Feeling as though you had some input into the characters’ action, and also having the opportunity to experience the multiple paths and ‘what its’ that often occurs.

    Developing a new medium to bring these potentially endless stories excites me with hope for more to come.

    1. Well here’s hoping! I recently came across one written especially for adults. I just may have to look into it.
      Thank you for your comment! πŸ™‚

        1. Aww, sorry to hear that. But I’m glad you think so! Choose Your Own Adventure books are always a lot of fun. πŸ˜€

  6. I just wanted to let you know that this inspired me to do the choose-your-own-adventure style serial, Blood Red Sun, that I just started up on my site. I love when I come across inventive stuff like this. Some great work, keep it up!

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